saving graceSaving Grace was a surprise to me. When I have read other ‘romantic thrillers’ I have usually found them not so much about the thriller as the romance, with sometimes sketchy effect. This little novel was different. It did do the romance, but it was heavy on the thriller, which suits my particular tastes.

What I felt was a great deal of respect for the author. Grace and Ray have been married for nearly five years. But what they don’t know about each other could fill volumes. In the end, while the thriller and romance writing was very good, what really impressed me is how well Norah explored the manner in which people can live together, love one another, and yet know next to nothing about who each person truly is.

While Grace and Ray are on the run, as well described in other reviews, what I found the most interesting about her writing is how she took two people and opened them up to the reader, telling a story of how we can build a shadow life for ourselves, living within a mythical self-portrait – and how that shadow life can nearly destroy both you and the people you love. Another thing I liked very much about the story, in this same vein, is the growth of Grace as a person as she began to walk out of that shadow and find herself as a person. Very cool.

In the long run, Grace saved Ray as much as he saved her. Nice!

The amnesia portion of the book is well researched and realistic, unlike other books that plunge into the murky waters of the far-from-common total amnesia, Norah handles the situation with an extremely deft hand.

Overall, this book was a very nice way to fill a few hours. The characters are highly believable, the story line interesting and not overdone. If you like romances, light thrillers, and books that allow you to see a great deal of personal development in the characters, you can’t go wrong with “Saving Grace.”

Recommended.

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