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Trigger Warning: Short Fictions and Disturbances by Neil Gaiman

Trigger Warning: Short Fictions and Disturbances | [Neil Gaiman]

  • Audible.com New Release!
  • Written by: Neil Gaiman
  • Narrated by: Neil Gaiman
  • Length: 11 hrs and 1 min 
  • Unabridged Audiobook
  • Publisher’s Summary

Neil Gaiman returns to dazzle, captivate, haunt, and entertain with this third collection of short fiction following Smoke and Mirrors and Fragile Things–which includes a never-before-published American Gods story, “Black Dog”, written exclusively for this volume.

In this new anthology, Neil Gaiman pierces the veil of reality to reveal the enigmatic, shadowy world that lies beneath. Trigger Warning includes previously published pieces of short fiction–stories, verse, and a very special Doctor Who story that was written for the fiftieth anniversary of the beloved series in 2013–as well as “Black Dog”, a new tale that revisits the world of American Gods, exclusive to this collection.

Trigger Warning explores the masks we all wear and the people we are beneath them to reveal our vulnerabilities and our truest selves. Here is a rich cornucopia of horror and ghost stories, science fiction and fairy tales, fabulism and poetry that explore the realm of experience and emotion. In “Adventure Story”–a thematic companion to The Ocean at the End of the Lane–Gaiman ponders death and the way people take their stories with them when they die. His social media experience “A Calendar of Tales” are short takes inspired by replies to fan tweets about the months of the year–stories of pirates and the March winds, an igloo made of books, and a Mother’s Day card that portends disturbances in the universe. Gaiman offers his own ingenious spin on Sherlock Holmes in his award-nominated mystery tale “The Case of Death and Honey”. And “Click-Clack the Rattlebag” explains the creaks and clatter we hear when we’re all alone in the darkness.

Full of wonder and terror, surprises and amusements, Trigger Warning is a treasury of delights that engage the mind, stir the heart, and shake the soul from one of the most unique and popular literary artists of our day.

©2015 Neil Gaiman (P)2015 HarperCollins Publishers

About the Author

Neil Gaiman
Image courtesy of backstagerider.com

Biography

Beginnings

Neil Gaiman was born in Hampshire, UK, and now lives in the United States near Minneapolis.  As a child he discovered his love of books, reading, and stories, devouring the works of C.S. Lewis, J.R.R. Tolkien, James Branch Cabell, Edgar Allan Poe, Michael Moorcock, Ursula K. LeGuin, Gene Wolfe, and G.K. Chesterton.  A self-described “feral child who was raised in libraries,” Gaiman credits librarians with fostering a life-long love of reading: “I wouldn’t be who I am without libraries. I was the sort of kid who devoured books, and my happiest times as a boy were when I persuaded my parents to drop me off in the local library on their way to work, and I spent the day there. I discovered that librarians actually want to help you: they taught me about interlibrary loans.”

Early Writing Career

Gaiman began his writing career in England as a journalist.  His first book was a Duran Duran biography that took him three months to write, and his second was a biography of Douglas Adams, ‘Don’t Panic: The Official Hitch Hiker’s Guide to the Galaxy Companion.’  Gaiman describes his early writing:  “I was very, very good at taking a voice that already existed and parodying or pastiching it.”‘Violent Cases’ was the first of many collaborations with artist Dave McKean.  This early graphic novel led to their series ‘Black Orchid,’ published by DC Comics.

The groundbreaking series ‘Sandman’ followed, collecting a large number of US awards in its 75 issue run, including nine Will Eisner Comic Industry Awards and three Harvey Awards.  In 1991, ‘Sandman’ became the first comic ever to receive a literary award, the 1991 World Fantasy Award for Best Short Story.
Established Writer & Creator
Neil Gaiman is credited with being one of the creators of modern comics, as well as an author whose work crosses genres and reaches audiences of all ages.  He is listed in the Dictionary of Literary Biography as one of the top ten living post-modern writers and is a prolific creator of works of prose, poetry, film, journalism, comics, song lyrics, and drama.

Gaiman has achieved cult status and attracted increased media attention, with recent profiles in The New Yorker magazine and by ‘CBS News Sunday Morning.’

Sci-Fi, Fantasy & Social Media

Audiences for science fiction and fantasy form a substantial part of Gaiman’s fan base, and he has continuously used social media to communicate with readers.  In 2001, Gaiman became one of the first writers to establish a blog, which now has over a million regular readers.

In 2008, Gaiman joined Twitter as @neilhimself and now has over 1.5 million followers and counting on the micro-blogging site.  He won the Twitter category in the inaugural Author Blog Awards, and his adult novel ‘American Gods’ was the first selection for the One Book, One Twitter (1b1t) book club.

Writing for Young Readers

Neil Gaiman writes books for readers of all ages, including the following collections and picture books for young readers: ‘M is for Magic’ (2007); ‘Interworld’ (2007), co-authored with Michael Reaves; ‘The Day I Swapped My Dad for Two Goldfish’ (1997); ‘The Wolves in the Walls’ (2003); the Greenaway-shortlisted ‘Crazy Hair’ (2009), illustrated by Dave McKean; ‘The Dangerous Alphabet’ (2008), illustrated by Gris Grimly; ‘Blueberry Girl’ (2009); and ‘Instructions’ (2010), illustrated by Charles Vess.

Gaiman’s books are genre works that refuse to remain true to their genres. Gothic horror was out of fashion in the early 1990s when Gaiman started work on ‘Coraline’ (2002).  Originally considered too frightening for children, ‘Coraline’ went on to win the British Science Fiction Award, the Hugo, the Nebula, the Bram Stoker, and the American Elizabeth Burr/Worzalla award. ‘Odd and the Frost Giants’, originally written for 2009’s World Book Day, has gone on to receive worldwide critical acclaim.

‘The Wolves in the Walls’ was made into an opera by the Scottish National Theatre in 2006, and ‘Coraline’ was adapted as a musical by Stephin Merritt in 2009.

Writing for Adults

Gaiman is the New York Times bestselling author of the novels ‘Neverwhere’ (1995), ‘Stardust’ (1999), the Hugo and Nebula Award-winning ‘American Gods’ (2001), ‘Anansi Boys’ (2005), and ‘Good Omens’ (with Terry Pratchett, 1990), as well as the short story collections ‘Smoke and Mirrors’ (1998) and ‘Fragile Things’ (2006).

His first collection of short fiction, ‘Smoke and Mirrors: Short Fictions and Illusions,’ was nominated for the UK’s MacMillan Silver Pen Awards as the best short story collection of the year. Most recently, Gaiman was both a contributor to and co-editor with Al Sarrantonio of ‘Stories’ (2010), and his own story in the volume, ‘The Truth Is A Cave In The Black Mountains,’ has been nominated for a number of awards.

‘American Gods’ has just been released in an expanded tenth anniversary edition, and there is an HBO series in the works.

Film and Television

Gaiman wrote the screenplay for the original BBC TV series of ‘Neverwhere’ (1996); Dave McKean’s first feature film, ‘Mirrormask’ (2005), for the Jim Henson Company; and cowrote the script to Robert Zemeckis’s ‘Beowulf.’ He produced ‘Stardust,’ Matthew Vaughn’s film based on Gaiman’s book by the same name.

He has written and directed two films: ‘A Short Film About John Bolton’ (2002) and Sky Television’s ‘Statuesque’ (2009) starring Bill Nighy and Amanda Palmer.

An animated feature film based on Gaiman’s ‘Coraline,’ directed by Henry Selick and released in early 2009, secured a BAFTA for Best Animated Film and was nominated for an Oscar in the same category.

Gaiman’s 2011 episode of Doctor Who, “The Doctor’s Wife,” caused the Times to describe him as “a hero.”

‘The Graveyard Book’

First published in the UK at the end of 2008, ‘The Graveyard Book’ has won the UK’s Booktrust Prize for Teenage Fiction and the Newbery Medal, the highest honor given in US children’s literature, as well as the Locus Young Adult Award and the Hugo Best Novel Prize.  The awarding of the 2010 UK CILIP Carnegie Medal makes Gaiman the first author ever to win both the Newbery Medal and the Carnegie Medal with the same book.  ‘The Graveyard Book,’ with its illustrations by Chris Riddell, was also shortlisted for the CILIP Kate Greenaway Medal for illustration – the first time a book has made both Medal shortlists in 30 years.

“Twenty-three years ago, we lived in a little Sussex town in a tall house across the lane from a graveyard. We didn’t have a garden, and our 18-month-old son loved riding a tricycle. If he tried riding in the house he would have died because there were stairs everywhere, so every day I would take him down our precipitous stairs, and he would ride his little tricycle round and round the gravestones. As I watched him happily toddling I would think about how incredibly at home he looked. I thought that I could do something like ‘The Jungle Book’ with that same equation of boy, orphaned, growing up somewhere else, but I could do it in a graveyard. I had that idea when I was 24 years old. I sat down and tried writing it and thought, ‘This is a really good idea, and this isn’t very good writing. I’m not good enough for this yet, and I will put it off until I’m better.”

The film adaptation of ‘The Graveyard Book’ is in production.

Biographical information courtesy of and copyright Neil Gaiman. All rights reserved.

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Audible Daily Deal: Everything That Rises Must Converge by Flannery O’Connor

DAILY DEAL

Everything That Rises Must Converge | [Flannery O’Connor]
Regular Price:  $17.61
Daily Deal Price: $3.95 or one credit
Ends 10/23/2014 @ 11:59PM ET
A new deal every day.
Whispersync for Voice-ready
4.10 (258 ratings)

Publisher’s Summary

This collection of nine short stories by Flannery O’Connor was published posthumously in 1965. The flawed characters of each story are fully revealed in apocalyptic moments of conflict and violence that are presented with comic detachment.

The title story is a tragicomedy about social pride, racial bigotry, generational conflict, false liberalism, and filial dependence. The protagonist, Julian Chestny, is hypocritically disdainful of his mother’s prejudices, but his smug selfishness is replaced with childish fear when she suffers a fatal stroke after being struck by a black woman she has insulted out of oblivious ignorance rather than malice.

Similarly, “The Comforts of Home” is about an intellectual son with an Oedipus complex. Driven by the voice of his dead father, the son accidentally kills his sentimental mother in an attempt to murder a harlot.

The other stories are “A View of the Woods”, “Parker’s Back”, “The Enduring Chill”, “Greenleaf”, “The Lame Shall Enter First”, “Revelation”, and “Judgment Day”.

Flannery O’Connor was working on Everything That Rises Must Converge at the time of her death. This collection is an exquisite legacy from a genius of the American short story, in which she scrutinizes territory familiar to her readers: race, faith, and morality. The stories encompass the comic and the tragic, the beautiful and the grotesque; each carries her highly individual stamp and could have been written by no one else.

©1956 1957, 1958, 1960, 1961, 1962, 1964, 1965; renewed 1993 by the Estate of Mary Flannery O’Connor (P)2010 Blackstone Audio, Inc.

What the Critics Say

“The current volume of posthumous stories is the work of a master, a writer’s writer—but a reader’s too—an incomparable craftsman who wrote, let it be said, some of the finest stories in our language.” (Newsweek)

“All in all they comprise the best collection of shorter fiction to have been published in America during the past twenty years.” (Book Week)

“When I read Flannery O’Connor, I do not think of Hemingway, or Katherine Anne Porter, or Sartre, but rather of someone like Sophocles. What more can you say for a writer? I write her name with honor, for all the truth and all the craft with which she shows man’s fall and his dishonor.” (Thomas Merton)

A Trip to the Hardware Store & Other Calamities (Quirky Essays for Quirky People ) by Barbara Venkataraman

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Everyone has them. Those weird tales, slightly embarrassing, a real pain when it is happening, but leaving a lasting impression.  You know the ones. The ones you pull out at parties, or over the meal when the new girl/boy friend comes to dinner and you want to embarrass the sister/brother.  That sort of things.

This little group of essays tells some of these little stories, and they are well worth the listen for a good chuckle and a story of your own for a party.  “Wait till you hear this! I listened to this group of essays the other day . . .”

I especially like the title essay, as I am a hardware store nut myself, and with Carrie Lee Martz’s narration it had me in stitches. Of course, all of the essays are funny and well worth the listen. Come on, it’s less than an hour long, pick it up and listen already! It’s only $2,76 at Audible, and if you are anything like me, it will make your day.

Enjoy!

I received the audio from the author, but this in no way impacts my review.

AWOL on the Appalachian Trail By David Miller

awol
This Brilliance Audio book caught my attention right away when I checked out the sale. I have always wondered what it would be like to hike the Trail!

Publisher’s Summary

In 2003, software engineer David Miller left his job, family, and friends to hike 2,172 miles of the Appalachian Trail. AWOL on the Appalachian Trail is Miller’s account of this thru-hike from Georgia to Maine. Listeners are treated to rich descriptions of the Appalachian Mountains, the isolation and reverie, the inspiration that fueled his quest, and the rewards of taking a less conventional path through life. While this book abounds with introspection and perseverance, it also provides useful passages about hiking gear and planning. This is not merely a travel guide; it is a beautifully written and highly personal view into one man’s journey and the insights gained by abandoning what is comfortable and routine.

©2011 David Miller (P)2012 Brilliance Audio, Inc.

 

ADBLCRE-3734_Hidden_Gem_Sale_Email_Masthead_ILL_RemUSC_2ASAs an Audible.com member, I get occasional e-mails with sale items – this particular sale, which ends TOMORROW has a LOT to recommend it!

If you aren’t an Audible.com member, I highly recommend it for it’s huge selection of Audio Books.  And, of course, it’s great sales!!

Thanks to David Miller for information on his book!

Half The Sky: Turning Oppression Into Opportunity For Women Worldwide

women
Half the Sky: Turning Oppression into Opportunity for Women Worldwide
Written by: Nicholas D. Kristof, Sheryl WuDunn
Narrated by: Cassandra Campbell
Length: 10 hrs and 33 mins
Format: Unabridged
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4.40 (465 ratings)

Half the Sky by Nicholas D. Kristof and Sheryl WuDunn An old Chinese proverb says “Women hold up half the sky.” Then why do the women of Africa and Asia persistently suffer human rights abuses? Continuing their focus on humanitarian issues, Pulitzer Prize-winning journalists Nicholas Kristof and Sheryl WuDunn take us to Africa and Asia, where many women live in profoundly dire circumstances. – Audible.com 

I am an Audible member, and today this is the “Daily Deal” from Amazon at only $3.95!

________________________

On a personal note, I am pretty much out for the count right now with new treatments. Better safe than sorry, right? So, I am only on occasionally until Monday.  For all my friends, Not To Worry – just a slightly elevated marker count.  I have my postchemo doctor’s appointment on Monday, and after that I am hoping to get back to full potential!

Review: Another Fine Myth by Robert Asprin

another
The Audio Edition is available here!

As a culture, we are always looking for the next best thing. Computers, cars, you name it. And, of course, books. Everything from urban fantasy to suspense, young adult to horror. Sometimes, though, what is New isn’t what we really need. Instead, what is Old is new again, or rather, it should be!

I just listened to Another Fine Myth by Robert Asprin, and narrated by Noah Michael Levine.  First printed in 1978, I found the series way back then, and have the whole collection in paper. Recently, however, the books have come out on Audible.com and, of course, I have to buy them all again. How can I help it? Noah Michael Levine does an amazing job of narrating! His voice and cadence are absolutely perfect for the reading. His grasp of accents is amazing, and he really brings the characters to life. I spent all night last night in my workroom, working on holiday gifts, and though I got really tired about 4AM, I couldn’t tear myself away. There is a sample reading on Audible, check it out and you will love it too!

Why SHOULDN’T Robert Lynn Asprin’s Skeeve be the next Harry Potter?!  It’s all there. Witches, Demons, and Wizards, Oh, My! And the Myth series is FUNNY. Like, burst out laughing on the airplane funny. And the voices by Noah take the laugh-out-loud character to a whole new level of laughter. Though Robert is now gone from us, his collaboration with Jody Lynn Nye means that the wonder of the tale lives on, and it is well worth the journey of discovery!

Skeeve, the main character of the series, is an apprentice wizard. He doesn’t really care all that much about being an apprentice wizard, of course. He was previously a thief, who got busted by the Wizard he was trying to rob. Instead of turning him into a frog, or something just as icky, the Wizard makes Skeeve an apprentice wizard. What are ya gonna do?

During the summoning of the Demon Aahz, an Assassin comes to call – and that is when things get rather messy. When the Wizard is killed, Skeeve is stuck now with the Demon Aahz, summoned from his own world, and none too happy about it. What follows? Well, you will just have to read the book to find out! Or rather, I would actually listen to it. You will NOT be disappointed if you like funny, well paced, creative and wonderful story lines.

Enjoy!!!! Highly Recommended

The Man in Black fled across the desert . . .

Under_The_DomeThe Stephen King novel “Under The Dome” is coming out as a television series.. CBS has given Under the Dome a 13 episode order, and Brian K. Vaughan is writing the series.

I was not a huge fan of “Under The Dome” (the book) myself. It just couldn’t hold my attention for some reason. However, I will be putting it in the DVR to see if the write by Brian K. Vaughan captures my attention. Who knows, I may go back and re-read the book after seeing an episode of two.

This is a good time, I think, to bring back a review I did some time ago on Audible.com This is one of my favorite of King’s works, and George Guidell does a killer job on the narration. I highly recommend it!

the gunslingerThe Dark Tower The Gunslinger

“The Man In Black fled across the desert, and the Gunslinger followed. The desert was the apotheosis of all deserts, huge, standing to the sky for what looked like eternity in all directions.”

Back in the 80’s, before “The Dark Tower” became the huge hit it is today, I lucked out, coming upon this jewel of modern American writing in a tiny little used book store in a tiny little town in Texas. King dreamed up the story from a reading of “Childe Roland To The Dark Tower Came” by Robert Browning, and carries all of the angst, pain an despair which fills that poem.

The series centres around Roland Deschain, The Last Gunslinger, who may be a creature of myth and legend, or simply a man, as he tracks the Man In Black across a bleak and hopeless desert – a desert of reality and of the soul.

“My first thought was, he lied in every word,
That hoary cripple, with malicious eye
Askance to watch the working of his lie
On mine, and mouth scarce able to afford
Suppression of the glee that pursed and scored
Its edge, at one more victim gained thereby. ” Robert Browning

The Gunslinger immediately gripped my attention and refused to release me. Poetry, mythology, pain and loss, a searching of the mind soul and body. As a Browning fan, the concept touched me deeply.

Over the years, I was thrilled every time a new Tower came out, and was never disappointed. This is King stretching himself, moving outside his “horror” boundaries, while still remaining true to his writing style in many ways. The world of the Tower is desolate, painful and digs deep into archetypes of the human soul.

Is this another world, somewhere lost among the tides and times of the Universe, old beyond measure and dying? Or is this our world, old itself beyond measure, stretched thin and worn, fading into the universe with a whimper, rather than a bang.

The story grows and develops over the subsequent editions, building and expanding on its mythos, its archetypes, its heart. A serialized novel of depth and power, of heartbreak and redemption, with characters unlike any others, The Tower is a blend of poetry, art and prose unlike any other. Read “The Gunslinger.” Then gift your soul with the rest of the series. And think – – – what is real? Are we? Is Roland? Is the world of Roland just on the other side of our own reality?

George Guidell does his normal, spectacular job as the voice of the Audible.com edition of the series. His voice, which has narrated over 900 audio books, and won two Audie Awards for Excellence in audio book narration, is perfect for the part and never deviates from its power and perfection.

Review: Patricia Briggs – Frost Burned

Audio is the way to go with Patricia Briggs!
Audio is the way to go with Patricia Briggs!

MONSTER FIVE STAR REVIEW!!!!

This is a review of the Audio Edition, which I highly recommended.

I have a confession. There are certain authors that, whenever they have a new book coming out, I go back and re-listen to all their books and short stories, in order, to prepare myself for the newest installment. It has always been my habit with series I love the most, allowing me to re-immerse myself into the series and all the characters. And, as always, Mercy (and Patricia, of course ((GRIN)) don’t disappoint in this newest installment to the series.
Mercy is tough. Tougher, smarter, and classier than nearly any other Urban Fantasy heroine out there today. She has been through hell in the last couple of years, and the quality of Patricia’s follow through and deep care for the development of her characters is still as amazing as always.

Mercy has been beaten, tortured, shot, burned and variously abused. And, she has been raped. Patricia’s handling of that rape was brilliant. She didn’t break Mercy completely, but she definitely is taking her time helping Mercy heal completely. Her handling of the situation across the last few books has been masterful, making me wonder if Patricia might possibly know someone who had this happen to her. The great thing about her responses is the way Mercy(Patricia) is so honest in her handling of the situation, and how her friends all gather around her, support her, and help her through it. She killed the person who did it to her – bully for her!!!! And it wasn’t someone she trusted and had a true relationship with. Unlike other writers, Patricia didn’t make it a close “friend” and she didn’t make her carry the blame for what happened. Sure, she fells at fault at first, but she isn’t made to wallow in guilt and shame. Her flashbacks and panic attacks are realistic, but she comes to realize that she is not truly at fault. Patricia gains my undying respect for that. But, that is another book, the story line carried into this book, but not overwhelming it. Mercy is getting better. Good for her!!

The story line continues soon after the events of “River Marked” where Mercy was once again drug into a situation outside of her control, and did her best to handle it as she always does – she sees what needs to be done, and does it, no matter the cost to herself.

As in her other stories, Mercy is strong, secure and focused. She knows, going in, that it is going to cost her for what she does. But she does it anyway, because it is right and good and true. She is the kind of person anyone could wish themselves to be. She doesn’t whine and complain, she just does the right thing. She is given what she needs to get the job done, and she does it. Often, at great cost – especially to her body, and sometimes to her very soul.

One of the other things I like about Mercy is her relationship with Adam. He is an alpha wolf and a strong one. But he doesn’t lord over Mercy. He doesn’t shove her around, force her to submit to his will. He loves her the way she is, tough as nails, scarred and beaten up and all. He knows that she does what she does because it is right and good. He doesn’t try to overwhelm, but he does give her the support she needs. In this edition, it is him and the rest of the Pack that Mercy is coming to the rescue of, and he knows without doubt that he can rely on her in all things. Very impressive in a writer.

Many of the other characters in the series make a stronger appearance in this edition than they have had the opportunity for in past books, and I love that. Patricia’s ‘extras on set’ are fascinating in their own right, with back stories that deserve all the attention they can get. She could go on writing this series for as many books as she wishes, and I would invest in every one. But I would also happily invest in books lead by some of the other characters as well – especially Zee. I was, however, heartbroken by the loss of a pivotal member of the story. I know, I know, losses are to be expected, and there has been little true loss through the story line, but the loss of this particular character had me in tears.

As for Stephen, Mercy’s vampire friend – well, I am prejudiced. It would be very, very hard for me to be friends with Stephen, no matter what. Hey, there has to be someone you can’t bring yourself to like, right? Well, besides Marcillia . . . Stephen has been around since that witch Marcillia first showed up in what was an undiscovered country back in their day – and had everything to do with the fact that Mercy is nearly alone as a Walker these days. Stupid vampires. Hate em, hate em . . .

Even though Stephen is a “friend” of Mercy’s, he is still just as guilty as Marcillia and the others of slaughtering Mercy’s people. No forgiveness here, Stephen! Of course, as a “Native” myself I am allowed to be bitter about the slaughter of our peoples, right? That is my excuse, and I am sticking with it!

Overall, Patricia’s series is quality all the way. As I always listen to her books, I can also assure you that Lorelei King again delivers an incredible narration. We have been blessed to have her brilliant voice as Mercy for each of the books in the series and she never disappoints. Much as Renée Raudman IS Kate Daniels, Lorelei IS Mercy. Talk about matches made in Heaven!

You can read “Frost Burned” as a stand alone. However, I don’t recommend it. You would be depriving yourself of a brilliant writer’s work, magnificent characters (even those you love to hate), tremendous world building and many hours of pure pleasure.

Highly, highly recommended – as in, however many stars you want to add on to the FIVE I give all of the Mercy Thompson books, you may still want to toss in a few, they are THAT good.

Here is a list of Mercy Thompson books, in order. I HIGHLY recommend that you start at the first and go all the way through. It is well worth it!

moon called

Moon Called: Mercy Thompson, Book 1

blood bound

Blood Bound: Mercy Thompson, Book 2

iron kissed

Iron Kissed: Mercy Thompson, Book 3

Bone Crossed: Mercy Thompson, Book 4 bone crossed

silver borne

Silver Borne: Mercy Thompson, Book 5

River Marked: Mercy Thompson, Book 6river marked

Audio IS the way to go with Patricia Briggs!!!
Audio IS the way to go with Patricia Briggs!!!

And I just saw on Patty’s website the name of her next installment:NIGHT BROKEN!!!!

Doesn’t say when, but it is going on my MUST BUY IMMEDIATELY FROMaudible  list!!!

Manure still doesn’t smell like roses . . .

gravestoneWhat it DOES smell like it Charlaine Harris giving her readers of the last 10-years, those who have made her rich, a great big steaming pile of dog crap and calling it the wrap-up of a series I have been calling a friend for all these years.

Rather than a review, I will point you to the exceptional one-star (can we PLEASE have negative stars????) reviews at Amazon.com and other places, and instead, copy you on the e-mail I sent to Audible.com:

“I put Charlaine Harris’ “Dead Ever After” on my preorder list, and was happy to receive it on the publication date. I have no problem with Audible. I have been a loyal customer for years. I have never asked for a credit back. Until now.

Harris purposely wrote a horrible ending to our 10-year journey with her character. She apparently did it to insult her loyal readers who have made her a very rich woman. I may have to suffer the indignity of an author insulting me, but I DON’T intend to give her yet more of my hard-earned money so that she can make money from doing it.

Please see the Amazon reviews for proof of Harris’ betrayal and the reasons behind it.

Again, I may have paid for some bad books during my years with Audible. That is on me, and I won’t quibble over the credit. But I am hereby officially asking for my credit back for Dead Ever After and for the book to be removed from my library on your site. I have removed it from my Audible Manager. Since my cancer, books are my only real treat for myself. The insult I feel by Harris’ actions is deeply painful. “

Enough said. I think I just threw up in my mouth a little – better get the Listerine. And the aspirin. Then I am going to go find a much loved book, draw a hot bath and settle in with a bottle of Pinot Noir and about five pounds of chocolate and try to get past the trauma.

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