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Review: A Cold Day For Murder: Kate Shugak #1 $1.99 Audible

audible

 

A Cold Day for Murder: A Kate Shugak Mystery | [Dana Stabenow]

Written by: Dana Stabenow
Narrated by:
Marguerite Gavin
Length:
5 hrs and 31 mins
Series: Kate Shugak, Book 1
Unabridged
Audiobook
Release Date:
10-18-11
Publisher:
Brilliance Audio
Regular Price:
$17.49
Member Price:
$12.24 or 1 Credit
Special Price:$1.99

 

Publisher’s Summary

Eighteen months ago, Aleut Kate Shugak quit her job investigating sex crimes for the Anchorage DA’s office and retreated to her father’s homestead in a national park in the interior of Alaska. But the world has a way of beating a path to her door, however remote. In the middle of one of the bitterest Decembers in recent memory ex-boss — and ex-lover — Jack Morgan shows up with an FBI agent in tow. A Park ranger with powerful relatives is missing, and now the investigator Jack sent in to look for him is missing, too.

Reluctantly, Kate, along with Mutt, her half-wolf, half-husky sidekick, leaves her wilderness refuge to follow a frozen trail through the Park, twenty thousand square miles of mountain and tundra sparsely populated with hunters, fishermen, trappers, mushers, pilots and homesteaders. Her formidable grandmother and Native chief, Ekaterina Shugak, is — for reasons of her own — against Kate’s investigation; her cousin, Martin, may be Kate’s prime suspect; and the local trooper, Jim Chopin, is more interested in Kate than in her investigation. In the end, the sanctuary she sought after five and a half years in the urban jungles may prove more lethal than anything she left behind in the city streets of Anchorage.

State of suspense: listen to more Alaskan mysteries in the Kate Shugak series.

©2011 Dana Stabenow (P)2011 Brilliance Audio, Inc

Review:

When I noticed A Cold Day For Murder was only $1.99 at Audible, I went back to look at my review here on my site. . . and realized, there isn’t a review here. Hum… Being a HUGE lover of Dana Stabenow, I am somewhat flummoxed that I only have a review for Fire and Ice, which is from her Liam Campbell series, reviewed on site. Well, fiddle. There are nearly 950 reviews on Amazon, so my review won’t make that much difference I suppose – and seeing as how I have over 500 reviews on Amazon (yea!) I am not going to go through pages and pages to see if I wrote reviews before I started SIRTBT. So, here is a short review (Me? A Short Review?! Will wonders never cease?)

Kate Shugak is one of my favorite female characters of all time. Tough and determined, she is also damaged and flawed – in other words, a very real, very human character. Kate is Aleut, raised by her grandmother Ekaterina, a former Tribal Council member and still chief. She grew up in The Park, “twenty million acres, almost four times the size of Denali National Park but with less than one percent of the tourists.” Occupied by Native Aleut and a collection of oddballs and “stay away from them or you will get your ass shot – and you might be dinner as well” types, The Park is a wonderland – and a cold, heartless land where the slightest misstep could mean a brutal death.

The story itself has been well described by others, and you get the gist from the summary. What I want to tell you about is the world of Kate and her tribe. The Aleut have suffered for centuries, first at the hands of the Russians, then the Americans, and Stabenow weaves that story in to her narrative – giving you a good idea of just why the tribal members could really care less that a rich little white boy has gone missing – good riddance to the Outsider with the rich and powerful daddy.

What is truly breathtaking about Stabenow’s writing is her descriptive narrative – her true love for her native land shines out through her writing. And being a huge Marguerite Gavin fan, I am always pulled into all of the Kate stories.

A Fatal Thaw | [Dana Stabenow]Book Two, A Fatal Thaw, is now on Audible, and I can finally add it to my collection! There are 20 books in the series now (Book 11, The Singing of the Dead, is still not available on 271297Audible, but hopefully whatever is keeping it unavailable will be corrected soon.)

I will warn you – if you like the first book, they are like potato chips – you can’t listen to just one!

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Tomorrow Is Thanksgiving – Time To Change It To “Thinksgiving”?

Mohammed Zeyara posted this on Facebook this morning. First, you must realize I have no real idea who this person is, he is simply someone who wound up on my ‘following you’ list. Huh. A guy with over a million followers is following me-how cool is that?

The forced removal of the Cherokee Nation took them 1,000 miles west to Oklahoma, but along the way thousands died from starvation, disease or freezing to death during the winter months of the forced removal. Some estimates say that 55% of the Cherokee Nation died as a direct result of the Trail of Tears. (A Little Matter of Genocide, Churchill)

Anyway, I was reading this, and it really hit home for me. My family on my mother’s side was Quapaw, a Native American Tribe. They were part of the “Great Removal” – the Cherokee Trail of Tears, (other tribes, including Choctaw and Quapaw were gathered up at the same time) carried out by the White Man, shoving us off our lands and into the barrens of Oklahoma onto “Reservations” (think the Japanese Prison Camps in the US during the World Wars).

I always think of this when “Thanksgiving” comes around. Needless to say, I am not a big fan of the holiday. Then I think of all the other atrocities in the world . . .

So, I wrote the following and posted it on Facebook. I think the concept is important enough that I am asking you to read it here. And maybe you will think about meeting my challenge?


A small body of determined spirits fired by an unquenchable faith in their mission can alter the course of history. – Mahatma Gandhi

Humans are, at base, savage beasts made more savage by their intellect – their ability to plan violence for reasons that have nothing to do with feeding their young or guarding their homes. They do it for power, glory, and wealth. Things a true “savage beast” would never consider. Animals kill for food and for the safety of their young and their family groups. Humans do it because they can.

 At one time or another every human “group” – Native American, African, Catholic, Jew, Christian, Hispanic, Celtic, you name it, have all been the ‘target’ of the rest of the world. Oh, and must I mention gays, lesbians, and women? As long as humans are determined to make themselves “better” than other humans, for ANY REASON we won’t evolve beyond savages, no matter how much “better” we put ourselves forward as being than anyone else.

Here is just one example that brings me immense pain. “White Pride” groups tell Hispanics that they should get out of “Their” country – and yet, this was Hispanic/Native American land long before the white armies came in and overran their country. If White groups want everyone “other” to go home, shouldn’t they load up the boats and go back to Europe? This is simply an example, not a rant, just a point – – – NO ONE  is without guilt, and NOTHING in this world will become better until we all decide to look beyond skin colour, religion, sex, race, and all those other “reasons” for fomenting hatred.

Maybe, for this Holiday season, everyone should consider meeting a person they most fear, whether because of their skin colour, race, sexual orientation, whatever, I don’t care. And I encourage you to sit down with them over a cup of tea and really get to know the PERSON. Are you brave enough to do that? To face your fears and prejudices, to reach out with your mind and heart and learn? You may be surprised to learn just how similar you are….I have no great love for Christians, for many, many reasons, but that doesn’t keep me from considering a local minister a dear friend. We share a love of gardening, of food and books and many other things that have nothing to do with her religion and everything to do with her being a genuinely good person. I cherish the things we share, and honour the things we don’t. Maybe, one person at a time, we can learn to accept our differences?

Edit Finished! Skin Walkers: Conn By Susan Bliler

conn
Follow Susan Bliler’s blog for the publication date of the new edit for Skin Walkers: Conn and all the rest of her wonderful series!

I just shipped off the edited copy of Skin Walkers: Conn to Susan for checking and approval. Yea!

You can see my review of the original at here on my site, of course.  It is just as good as it was before, just grammatical and continuity changes made. See Susan’s site at www.susanbliler.com for more about her Skin Walkers series. If you like action, adventure, fantasy and romance, this is a series you should NOT pass up!

For those of you who have the books already, check Amazon.com for a list of Susan’s works, including all newly edited books. You should have access to the new edits there!

Enjoy!

 

susan
Go here to Susan’s Goodreads Page!

About Susan

My pack territory is in North Central Montana. Born and raised in an untamed location that bridges the gap between rolling prairie and majestic mountain peaks, I am born to a family that also bridges the gap between cultures. My father’s people boast a fiercely proud Scottish ancestry while my mother’s tribes descend from two savagely beautiful and unique nations that inspire my Skin Walkers series.

I’m a huge fan of MMA, boxing, hockey, 30 Seconds to Mars, Linkin Park, DMX, the Killers, and 21 Pilots (“sometimes quiet is violent…”). I also love to read because it encourages me to write. ( I always hate it when authors add that they love coffee and chocolate. Really? Who doesn’t love coffee and chocolate?) Anyway, I love beer…kidding. I don’t love beer, but we are engaged in a very serious relationship. (Mom, please don’t call me when you read this.)

Check me out at www.susanbliler.com

A’hau.

 

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