Search

So, I Read This Book Today

Editing, Proofreading, Reviewing and Other Stuff

Tag

politics

Review: A Beautiful Blue Death by Charles Finch #VictorianCozy

A Beautiful Blue Death (Charles Lenox Mysteries, #1)1865. While the US is enjoying the end of the Civil War, in London the Liberals take over Parliament in the form of Lord Palmerston, who died that same year leaving Lord John Russell as Prime Minister. And Lady Jane Grey has sent a note to her platonic love, Charles Lenox.

Dearest,

Would you come over before supper, perhaps at a little past six o’clock? Something has happened. Do come, Charles.
Yours, faithfully,
&c.
Jane

What follows is a tale of mystery, politics, society and the upper-crust formality for which the Victorian period is so well known. Lenox is no Lord Peter Whimsey – he is much more reserved, his intelligence sharp, but quieter and more reserved.

This is very much a “Victorian Cozy” mystery, with interesting characters and a landscape that pulls you into the sights, scents and sounds of Victorian London. Honestly, I requested the book by mistake, as I wouldn’t normally read a historical (it simply isn’t my genre) but I still enjoyed it.

I received this book from Netgalley in exchange for a realistic review. All thoughts are my own.

Advertisements

Review: Destiny by Tom Lowe

Destiny | [Tom Lowe]“I can calculate the motion of heavenly bodies, but not the madness of people.” – Isaac Newton

Nearly all men can stand adversity, but if you want to test a man’s character, give him power. — Abraham Lincoln

There are very few people who are going to look into the mirror and say, ‘That person I see is a savage monster;’ instead, they make up some construction that justifies what they do. — Noam Chomsky

“There is no denying that Hitler and Stalin are alive today… they are waiting for us to forget, because this is what makes possible the resurrection of these two monsters.” – Simon Wiesenthal

Isaac Newton. Arguably the greatest scientist who has ever lived, and some say the greatest who will ever live. Newton’s time was as unique as him – a time of great learning living alongside the darkness of ignorance, brutality and savage poverty – often encouraged by a church that held down the populace with the whip of superstition.

Nature and Nature’s laws lay hid in night: God said, “Let Newton be!” and all was light.
Alexander Pope.

 A brilliant scientist, without a doubt. But what could he have accomplished if he hadn’t spent thousands of hours, thousands of pages, on superstition?

* * *

Paul Marcus is a broken man. His wife and young daughter were murdered on the side of a dark, rainy road, Paul barely surviving a bullet and knife. His family slaughtered, he retreats from his work at the NSA. A brilliant mathematician and cryptographer, Paul leaves it all behind to spend time on his farm with his wife and daughter’s horses and the family dog Buddy. It is a quiet life, not truly fulfilling mentally, but he simply can’t force himself to return to his old life.

Suddenly, Paul finds himself forced back into the world. And all hell breaks loose. The newest Nobel Laureate in Medicine, he has no interest in accepting a prize he is being offered for decoding the portions of human DNA that controls a particular heart disease – a disease his daughter suffered. It didn’t save her – nothing could have, not when a bullet tore her life away. But the President of the United States is up for the Nobel Peace Prize, and it just wouldn’t look good for him if Paul refuses to accept the award.

Then he receives a telephone call that could change not only his own life, but the lives of every being on earth. Isaac Newton’s studies into the Bible have been found. But what do they mean? Are they the ramblings of a man so determined to find meaning where none exists that he is jousting at shadows? Or are the hundreds of thousands of words he wrote truly a window into the thoughts of god, and a warning of a coming Armageddon?

To be honest, I didn’t really think, once I figured out what the story was truly about, that I would be able to tolerate it, much less enjoy it. Was I ever completely and utterly wrong. 17 hours and 35 minutes of narration by Mikael Naramore and I was totally immersed in the story the whole time. Yes, parts of it made me smack my forehead and growl. The Bible was written by humans, rewritten and translated over and over through many languages – Hebrew, Greek, Roman, Arabic, Persian, Turkish, the list goes on and on, portions left out that didn’t conform to the church’s current thought processes, power struggles or intentions. Anything that might have been learned has long since been lost. But Newton was absolutely certain that the Bible was truly the word of god, and his findings would save the world.

Called to Jerusalem to interpret the papers and decode the work, he finds himself drawn into a world of intrigue, international espionage and murder, and shocking (horrifying) views into world politics and plots going back to the Nazi regime – and then further back to the 16th century. Plots that feed the fortunes of a select few families with intentions of ruling the world – and plans to destroy the very world that cradles us all. All. For. Money. Well, and power, we can’t forget power. Power beyond anything any rational human being could possibly realize.

I was completely enthralled by the amount of research that went into this book. It was, in a word, amazingly well researched and thought out. History, politics, finance, it’s all there, and all captivating. I could rattle on and on, but I will leave it for you to find for yourself. Well worth all 17 hours 36 minutes!

I received this book from the publisher in exchange for a realistic review. Highly recommended if you are prepared to open your mind to it.

    • Written by: Tom Lowe
    • Narrated by: Mikael Naramore
    • Length: 17 hrs and 35 mins 
    • Unabridged Audiobook
      Whispersync for Voice-ready

Review: The Great Zoo of China by Matthew Reilly

Ancient societies had anthropomorphic gods: a huge pantheon expanding into centuries of dynastic drama; fathers and sons, martyred heroes, star-crossed lovers, the deaths of kings – stories that taught us of the danger of hubris and the primacy of humility. – Tom Hiddleston

‘Cause suicide is painless
it brings on many changes
and I can take or leave it if I please.
…and you can do the same thing if you choose.
MAS*H – Johnny Mandel Lyrics

Hubris and science are incompatible. – Douglas Preston

By failing to prepare, you are preparing to fail. – Benjamin Franklin

 

Let’s face it. Matthew Reilly is the reigning King of the high-octane, over-the-top action/adventure novel. From Ice Station, my first Reilly novel, to Scarecrow and his other novels, he is the master of the “literary 400 mph bullet train” story. And here, he does it again.

The Great Zoo of China appears at first to be simply Jurassic Park on steroids. Human hubris, taken to extremes, as humans endeavor to create a monstrous (literally) exhibit to shock and awe the world. And, like so many other human endeavors, this bit of human hubris is destined to destroy the world – unless a small group can stop the insanity.

Meddle Not In The Affairs Of Dragons For You Are Crunchy
And Taste Good With Ketchup

There are many things to love about The Great Zoo of China. Reilly has, as usual, done his homework on the background and politics of the story. Utilizing the political, economic and sociological quirks and horrors of Chinese growth and development, Reilly has layered complex ideas and issues with the aforementioned political intrigue and a heavy dose of scientific development to create a story that is actually much more interesting than Jurassic Park. Todays ‘new’ China, is all about the Money, as the country utilizes near slave-wage conditions to create massive new cities, dams, basically anything they need – no matter the cost. And here, they do it again, reaching for the spectacular ‘money-is-no-object’ outcome they are reaching for . . . but Reilly makes a pinpoint observation. The Chinese have the cold, hard cash. But what they don’t have, after generations of communist control, is the ability to think and create. They can build, but their inability to create means that they also cannot think ahead, cannot foresee all possible outcomes. And what they cannot foresee is the intelligence of the creatures they consider ‘less’ – and again, that hubris, that condescension, makes the story even more fascinating than a normal Reilly tale. Yes, it is fast and furious – but it is also thoughtful, and a smart statement of today’s worldwide political and economic climate.

Besides. It has a female lead – CJ Cameron is one smart lady, one of my favorite heroines of the books I have read in the last couple of years.

Highly recommended! I received this book from the publisher in exchange for a realistic review. I really enjoyed it, and hope you do as well. Publication date January 27, 2015.

Review: Venom: A Thriller in Paradise by Rob Swigart

20766773I am become death, the destroyer of worlds. – J. Robert Oppenheimer

Biggest mistake in history made by people who didn’t think. – Charlie Chan

A State in the grip of neo-colonialism is not master of its own destiny. It is this factor which makes neo-colonialism such a serious threat to world peace. – Kwame Nkrumah

 hu-man-i-ty (noun): the qualities or characteristics considered as a whole to be characteristic of human beings

Hum. What characteristics are human, really? Well, for all our vaunted intelligence, the way we utilize said is, taken overall, deeply mindless and deeply uncaring of anything other than ourselves, and the immediate rewards of whatever new and unusual methodology we find for destroying others – and thereby destroying everything.

Maintain the balance of power, they said. It was safe. There would be no danger for 500 or 1000 years.

The French say that their nuclear tests on the Island of Moruroa, in the Tuomotus, are ‘safe’. But now, the Ocean Mother has come ashore, floating free in the Kalalono Bay. All aboard are dead. But why? And how? And how is it connected to the nuclear tests on the Island of Moruroa?

Politics. Intelligence (or what passes for it). Biology, physics, and a heaping helping of Polynesian and Haitian religion builds Venom: A Thriller in Paradise builds a sharp and layered vision of the horrors of the creativity of the human mind – and the depth the human political psyche will go to in order to cover their political asses.

Tutti venini sono freddi: “All poisons are cold.” – Brunetto Latini

Many are dead. Many more are endangered. As biologist Dr. Chazz Koenig and Lt. Cobb Takamura struggle to find the method of death of the ship’s crew, a serial killer rampages across Hawaii, his reasons unclear, his ties to the original murders both twisted and indistinct. And what must be done is oftentimes even more horrific than what has gone before. And what has gone before may be only the beginning.

A great story, a thoughtful and modern book of environmental terrorism which runs in the other direction – the terrorism of political control and political games grown out of control, of death and destruction and fear, and the waste of the world.

Oh, and did I say, this is a really GREAT story?

Review: White Plague by James Abel -Stunning!

White Plague by James AbelAnd I looked, and behold a pale horse: and his name that sat on him was Death, and Hell followed with him. And power was given unto them over the fourth part of the earth, to kill with sword, and with hunger, and with death, and with the beasts of the earth. – Revelations 6:8 – King James Bible

Paneloux is a man of learning, a scholar. He hasn’t come in contact with death; that’s why he can speak with such assurance of the truth-with a capital T. But every country priest who visits his parishioners and has heard a man gasping for breath on his deathbed thinks as I do. He’d try to relieve human suffering before trying to point out its goodness. -Albert Camus – The Plague Part 2

There is no act of treachery or meanness of which a political party is not capable; for in politics there is no honour. – Benjamin Disraeli
What is the point to winning a war – if all your subjects are rotting in their graves? For me, no ideological or political conviction would justify the sacrifice of a human life. For me, the value of life is absolute, with no concessions. It’s not negotiable. Edgar Ramirez

It begins, as do many things, death amongst them, with silence. The pleas for help stopped coming just after five in the morning, Washington time. The Pentagon staffers cleared for handling sensitive messages sat in horror for a moment and then tried other ways to reach the victims. Nothing worked, so they called the director, who phoned me.

And what follows horrified me, chilled me to the bone, and kept me reading four hours past when I should, by all reasonable measure, put it down and gone to bed. And horrifying the story is, for a lot of different reasons, but mainly? For the absolute, gut wrenching reality of it all. And just how true it is – how likely that something like this will happen.

Lt. Colonel Joe Rush gets the call at 1am, Anchorage time, as he pounds the streets, running from sleep, running from memories. Memories of decisions which saved lives, while taking others. Which left him with the weight of the world on his shoulders, the blackness of grief in his heart. Two weeks. Just two weeks until he retires. And now, this. A new submarine prototype has surfaced in the Arctic – and it is burning. One-hundred-fifty seven souls, trapped on the ice. And no one is near enough to reach them except the single ice breaker the US government has funded to handle the vast spaces of the Arctic waters. Colonel Rush, MD and virology specialist, must get to them as quickly as possible if they are to save the people and salvage the submarine before Chinese or Russian icebreakers claim it for their own.

Monster storms, crushing ice, bone breaking cold – all are threats which Rush, the few Marines who accompany him, and the few Coast Guard sailors handling the Icebreaker Wilmington must meet and overcome to reach their burned and stranded submariners. The sick submariners. For a sickness is burning through the crew, a sickness that no one can identify.

It becomes a race, a race to save the people, to save the submarine, and to avert a single incident that could be the linchpin starting World War III. For as global warming breaks up the ice, opening trade routes and access to unknown stores of oil, gems, metals and trade routes, the political machinations have begun. Great beasts of war are gathering, stomping their hooves, waving their swords, and foaming at the mouths for the blood of those they would call ‘enemy’.

What is the sickness? Where did it come from? And more importantly, can it be cured before the political machine does the unthinkable in a move to ascertain it’s own power? And who aboard the Wilmington is a traitor? And how high do the traitor’s contacts go – and to whom does he report?

No one becomes depraved all at once. – JUVENAL, Satires

All these questions and more make this a hair-raising, edge-of-your-seat military suspense/thriller beyond compare. With it’s roots dug deeply into current political and military policy, White Plague is, beyond a doubt, the BEST military suspense thriller I have read this year.

Highly recommended.

I received the book from Penguin’s First To Read program in exchange for a realistic review. All thoughts are my own and are not affected by this fact. For more information on First To Read, click.

Review: Exchange of Fire (An SBG Novel) by P.A. DePaul

Over grown military establishments are under any form of government inauspicious to liberty, and are to be regarded as particularly hostile to republican liberty. – George Washington

1. A mercenary shall not have the right to be a combatant or a prisoner of war. – Art 47. Protocol Additional to the Geneva Conventions of 12 August 1949, and relating to the Protection of Victims of International Armed Conflicts (Protocol I), 8 June 1977

Many military officials reportedly (also) expressed concerns that the security contractors were trigger-happy and “out-of-control cowboys who alienated the same Iraqis the military is trying to cultivate.” Defense Secretary Gates said that the contractors were at “cross purposes” with the military goals, and he suggested they be put under his authority. Opening Statement of Chairman Henry A.Waxman, in US Congress, House Oversight and Government Reform Committee, Hearing on Private Security Contracting in Iraq and Afghanistan, hearings, 110th Cong., 2nd sess., October 2, 2007

 

exchangeI first found Exchange of Fire on Reading In Pajamas and was intrigued. I love a “Kick Butt and Take Names” heroine, and Wraith definitively qualifies. A sharpshooting badass with a steady hand and a sharp eye, Wraith is part of a four-man (well, two men and two women, but you get the idea) with a super-secret, blackest-of-the-black private . . . well, corporation doesn’t really describe it. More like “If you even think that you know anything about the possibility of this group even existing, they will never find your body” sort of thing. Anyway! Nasty, nasty with razorblades on top.

But don’t think that this is all a bad deal. When the US government needs the really nasty, vicious, “how can they call these creatures humans” taken care of, they call SBG. And SBG gets it done. So, when they needed a cartel taken out that specialized in sex trafficking of young girls, Wraith, Magician, Talon and Romeo, and their leader, Cappy, are sent to Mexico to take care of the problem. However, after six months of chasing the cartel members, and losing young girls to short, horrific experiences, something had to be done. And what happened damaged Magician almost beyond salvaging – but it destroyed Wraith.

Six months later, the story picks up with Wraith living in a ‘bolt hole’ in the Carolinas, working for Grady, an ex-Marine who now runs a games center, full to bursting with go-cart tracks, a monster arcade room, paintball arena, and all the other wonderful, safe, fun goodies that kids and teenagers swoon over. They both have their damaged pasts to overcome, but Wraith’s makes Grady’s look like child’s play. But they are going to have to work together, because the monsters are coming – and they are out for blood.

The story was excellent. Fast action, two strong, capable women with guns and knives and scars pushed all my “Yeah, Baby!!!” buttons. When Magician, Talon, Romeo and Cappy come back on the scene, it is with a level of heart that was real and touching, with a dose of kicking Wraith’s ass, which she certainly deserved. They all have to pull together to get the bad guys. And the bad guys aren’t all on the other side – there is plenty of political backstabbing (with real knives).

DePaul does an exceptional job of weaving the problems of the American tendency towards uncontrolled, private black-ops corporations into the story in a brilliantly realistic manner. Some people will do anything for power, and absolute power, with absolutely no oversight and lots and lots of guns and ammo is more dangerous than we care to admit. The other thing that was handled with a deft touch was PTSD and how it affects the strongest, steadiest soldiers. There is only so much that any human being can handle, no matter how intensive their training.

The only drawback for me, honestly, was Grady. For an ex-Marine, I found him to be, well, let’s just say he lacked sac. My Marine adoptive father would have kicked his backside from here to California. “Geeze, would you like a little cheese with that whine? You would think he went over to the sandbox and played with little pink unicorns and fairies in tutus . . . Just sayin’. Other than wimpy boy, everything else about the book was rock solid, but Mr. Crybaby Pants dropped it a half-star for me. Pfft. I liked Talon lots better! 😉

I received a copy directly from Ms. Depaul in return for a realistic review. All thoughts and opinions are my own.

About The Author:

P.depaulA. DePaul is a multi-genre romance author including paranormal fantasy and romantic suspense. As an avid lover of stories, you can pretty much bet her nose is either stuck in a book or in front of a computer madly typing as she listens to the voices in her head (In her world it’s perfectly natural for her characters to tell her their tale so she can put it down on paper to their satisfaction).

dat face!
Check my Website here!

facebook logo

addtogoodreads

twitter logo

Review: Exchange of Fire (An SBG Novel) by P.A. DePaul

Over grown military establishments are under any form of government inauspicious to liberty, and are to be regarded as particularly hostile to republican liberty. – George Washington

1. A mercenary shall not have the right to be a combatant or a prisoner of war. – Art 47. Protocol Additional to the Geneva Conventions of 12 August 1949, and relating to the Protection of Victims of International Armed Conflicts (Protocol I), 8 June 1977

Many military officials reportedly (also) expressed concerns that the security contractors were trigger-happy and “out-of-control cowboys who alienated the same Iraqis the military is trying to cultivate.” Defense Secretary Gates said that the contractors were at “cross purposes” with the military goals, and he suggested they be put under his authority. Opening Statement of Chairman Henry A.Waxman, in US Congress, House Oversight and Government Reform Committee, Hearing on Private Security Contracting in Iraq and Afghanistan, hearings, 110th Cong., 2nd sess., October 2, 2007

 

exchangeI first found Exchange of Fire on Reading In Pajamas and was intrigued. I love a “Kick Butt and Take Names” heroine, and Wraith definitively qualifies. A sharpshooting badass with a steady hand and a sharp eye, Wraith is part of a four-man (well, two men and two women, but you get the idea) with a super-secret, blackest-of-the-black private . . . well, corporation doesn’t really describe it. More like “If you even think that you know anything about the possibility of this group even existing, they will never find your body” sort of thing. Anyway! Nasty, nasty with razorblades on top.

But don’t think that this is all a bad deal. When the US government needs the really nasty, vicious, “how can they call these creatures humans” taken care of, they call SBG. And SBG gets it done. So, when they needed a cartel taken out that specialized in sex trafficking of young girls, Wraith, Magician, Talon and Romeo, and their leader, Cappy, are sent to Mexico to take care of the problem. However, after six months of chasing the cartel members, and losing young girls to short, horrific experiences, something had to be done. And what happened damaged Magician almost beyond salvaging – but it destroyed Wraith.

Six months later, the story picks up with Wraith living in a ‘bolt hole’ in the Carolinas, working for Grady, an ex-Marine who now runs a games center, full to bursting with go-cart tracks, a monster arcade room, paintball arena, and all the other wonderful, safe, fun goodies that kids and teenagers swoon over. They both have their damaged pasts to overcome, but Wraith’s makes Grady’s look like child’s play. But they are going to have to work together, because the monsters are coming – and they are out for blood.

The story was excellent. Fast action, two strong, capable women with guns and knives and scars pushed all my “Yeah, Baby!!!” buttons. When Magician, Talon, Romeo and Cappy come back on the scene, it is with a level of heart that was real and touching, with a dose of kicking Wraith’s ass, which she certainly deserved. They all have to pull together to get the bad guys. And the bad guys aren’t all on the other side – there is plenty of political backstabbing (with real knives).

DePaul does an exceptional job of weaving the problems of the American tendency towards uncontrolled, private black-ops corporations into the story in a brilliantly realistic manner. Some people will do anything for power, and absolute power, with absolutely no oversight and lots and lots of guns and ammo is more dangerous than we care to admit. The other thing that was handled with a deft touch was PTSD and how it affects the strongest, steadiest soldiers. There is only so much that any human being can handle, no matter how intensive their training.

The only drawback for me, honestly, was Grady. For an ex-Marine, I found him to be, well, let’s just say he lacked sac. My Marine adoptive father would have kicked his backside from here to California. “Geeze, would you like a little cheese with that whine? You would think he went over to the sandbox and played with little pink unicorns and fairies in tutus . . . Just sayin’. Other than wimpy boy, everything else about the book was rock solid, but Mr. Crybaby Pants dropped it a half-star for me. Pfft. I liked Talon lots better! 😉

About The Author:

P.depaulA. DePaul is a multi-genre romance author including paranormal fantasy and romantic suspense. As an avid lover of stories, you can pretty much bet her nose is either stuck in a book or in front of a computer madly typing as she listens to the voices in her head (In her world it’s perfectly natural for her characters to tell her their tale so she can put it down on paper to their satisfaction).

dat face!
Check my Website here!

facebook logo

addtogoodreads

twitter logo

Sneek Peek: The Buried by Shelley Coriell

The-Buried-Sneak-Peek-Blitz[1]

 

When I was five or six, I got out of bed one night to get a drink of water. As I walked by the living room where my mom and dad were watching TV, a woman on the screen was clawing her way out of an earthen grave. The sight of that mud-covered hand and sound of her choked breathing left me frozen with fear.
For years I had nightmares about being buried alive. I’d wake up cold and shaking and gasping for air. To this day, I fear not being able to breathe. So of course I wrote a book about it! — Shelley Coriell
Coriell_TheBuried_MM[1]In THE BURIED, Grace Courtemanche—an ambitious, successful state prosecutor—is pulled into a world of terror and self-doubt when she receives calls from victims buried alive, and she must turn to the one man she swore she’d never need again, Hatch Hatcher, a rootless, smooth-talking FBI crisis negotiator in town to deal with a long-buried secret of his own.
Grace and Hatch’s story, book #2 in the Apostles Series featuring Parker Lord’s elite FBI team, was a tough one for me to write. I actually had to set it aside for two years because it was too dark. But when I finally figured out what the story was really about—family—I found my light, and even a bit of laughter, to balance all that dark.
I can’t wait for readers to join me for another dark and twisty but ultimately uplifting story of hope and the healing power of family.
-Shelley Coriell

Excerpt from THE BURIED by Shelley Coriell (On sale October 28, 2014)

As the bay of hounds tapered off, the huddle of men and women in the parking lot broke, moving swiftly. Hatch, on the other hand, moseyed to her side, his gait slow and easy, but there was nothing conciliatory in his eyes. “You should have told me.” His mouth and jaw barely moved as he spoke.
She tried to ease away, but he moved with her. “Told you what?”
“Hmmmmm, where should I start?” With his free hand, he jammed a finger in the air. “One, you received threats from a convicted felon. Two, you received nine phone calls from a girl presumably buried alive. And three, as we speak, a forensic team is sifting through dirt in your backyard looking for human bones.”
“It’s none of your business.”
“Oh, Princess. Dear, dear Princess.” He moved closer, a big, graceful, golden cat. He stopped a hairsbreadth from touching her, but the heat of his skin warmed her, nipping at the chill that had set in yesterday with Lia’s phone calls. When he spoke, his breath fanned her face in a low, rumbling half-purr, half-growl. “You have been and always will be my business.”
The words, the closeness, so Hatch. For a moment, she considered sinking into his strength and warmth, which proved how deeply rattled she was by the past twenty-four hours.
Hatch didn’t seem to notice the crazy thoughts flitting around her brain. He grabbed her elbow and led her toward a sheriff’s department SUV.
“I’m not going home.” Her boots dug into the damp earth.
Hatch opened the SUV’s passenger door. “I wouldn’t dare suggest it.”
“I’m involved in this.”
“That’s obvious.” He pointed to the seat.
“Where are we going?”
“Into the swamp to search for Lia Grant. Together.”
The humid air had left her hair a riot of waves, and she jammed a wayward curl behind her right ear. Together wasn’t hard for her. She was a team player when she had to be, and Lia Grant needed the biggest team they could muster, and frankly, Hatch was on a winning team. She’d be an idiot not to ally herself with him. She hopped in the SUV. “Where to?”
He reached into his pocket and took out a coin. “Call it in the air?”
“Wait! You’re going to let a coin toss determine our course of direction, which could very well determine if a girl lives or dies?”
Hatch fingered the coin. “Do you have a better plan?”
“Surely there’s a more systematic way to handle this. What does Agent MacGregor recommend?”
An enigmatic smile tugged at Hatch’s mouth. “Like all of us on Parker’s team, Jonny Mac understands the value of a good coin toss.” Hatch tossed the coin in the air, adding. “Heads we go right, tails, left.”
She snatched the coin in mid-air. Decades of tennis had done wonders for her hand/eye coordination. “I don’t think so.”
Hatch swept his hands at the dense forest stretching out behind the bait shop. “Fine, Princess. Lead and I shall follow.”
Grace cradled the coin in her palm. She’d already played the phone messages from Lia, listening for ambient sounds, ideally something like a jet plane, which could be tracked. But in all of the voicemails, she’d heard nothing but Lia’s increasingly desperate words.
I’m in a bad place, a really bad place.
A hand settled on her knee. Golden and steady. This was not Hatch her ex-husband but Hatch the Apostle. Hatch who was a master in a crisis situation. She ran her thumb over the face of the coin, and with quirked lips tossed it in the air. The coin spun and fell on the ground between them.
“Left.” Hatch pocketed the coin and with a seriousness she’d never seen from him, climbed into the SUV and drove into the swamp to find a girl who’d been buried alive.

###

Processed with VSCOcam with g3 presetRafflecopter – Thriller Prizepack feat. DEADLINE by Sandra Brown, WHERE EVIL WAITS by Kate Brady, THE BROKEN by Shelley Coriell, THE KILL ROOM by Jeffery Deaver, and IDENTICAL by Scott Turrow

Win a copy of THE BURIED Here!

Coriell_TheBuried_MM[1]THE BURIED by Shelley Coriell (October 28, 2014; Forever Mass Market; $8.00)

“It’s cold. And dark. I can’t breathe.”

Successful, ambitious state prosecutor Grace Courtemanche is at the top of her game. Then she gets a chilling call from a young woman claiming to be buried alive. Desperate to find the victim before it’s too late, Grace will do whatever it takes . . . even if it means excavating the darkest secrets of her own past and turning to the one man she thought she would never see again.FBI agent Theodore “Hatch” Hatcher is a man without roots-and that’s the way he likes it. But when a grisly crime shatters Cyprus Bend, Florida, Hatch is dragged back to the small town-and the one woman-he hoped was in his rearview for good. Forced to confront the wreckage of their love affair, Hatch and Grace may just find that sometimes the deepest wounds leave the most beautiful scars-and that history repeating itself may just be what they need to stop a killer . . . and save their own hearts.

Buy Links:

B&N
BAM!
iBooks
IndieBound
Amazon

Shelley_Coriell[1]About the author:

A former newspaper reporter, magazine editor, and restaurant reviewer. These days Shelley writes smart, funny novels for teens and big, edgy romantic suspense. A six-time Romance Writers of America Golden Heart Finalist, she lives and loves in Arizona with her family and the world’s neediest rescue Weimaraner. When she’s not behind the keyboard, you’ll find her baking high-calorie, high-fat desserts and haunting local farmers markets for the perfect plum.

Social Media Links:

Shelley_Coriell[1]
Click for website
facebook logotwitter logogoodreads_icon

 

 

 

Review: Dirty Blood by Heather Hildenbrand

dirtyIt is funny to consider an urban fantasy to be “charming” but that is just what Dirty Blood is – blood, guts, gore, murder and all. Without looking up how it is placed on the genre ladder, I would say that this qualifies as young adult, or new adult, but I found it extremely readable as an adult urban fantasy novel as well. Tara is 17-years-old, but she seems more mature, while still throwing the occasional temper tantrum. Of course, if I were her, I would have thrown a fit and fallen down in it at the way she is treated by those around her.

You see, Tara thinks that she is just a normal girl, with a normal boyfriend she has been friends with most of her life. Well, until he turned into the football obsessed moron who ditches their dates for recruiters, agents and interviews. But nevertheless, normal school, normal activities, normal life. That is, until a girl turns into a wolf right in front of her and proceeds to try her best to rip Tara’s throat out. From that point on, you can toss ‘normal’ straight out the window and go for spectacularly weird all the way around. For Tara is a Hunter, from a long line of Hunters. Genetic killers, born to kill werewolves.

As Tara’s life becomes more and more surreal, she begins to realize that her whole life has been a lie, and that she has been left open to the perils of her blooming talents and the scent of Hunter that the wolves can sense, with no training to help her survive. While her mother may have been ‘protecting’ her, she has also left her open to attack with no defense.

This is a very fast paced read. Tara is thrown into the metaphorical deep end of the pool, left to struggle to learn to fight and kill with the help of member of “The Cause” a group of Hunters and Werewolves who are trying to stop the fighting between the breeds – to create peace from the ashes of war. It is a lot for a 17-year-old to take in – especially when her mother is determined to bury her head in the sand and pretend that Tara can simply spend her life on the run, hiding from those who would kill her. Or would use her for their own ends. For Tara is something more than a Hunter, and what she is puts her at odds with both sides.

There is a love interest in the story, and it is incredibly well done. Her new boyfriend, Wes, is very special himself, a “Dirty Blood,” a hybrid of Wolf and Hunter, an abomination to those who would keep the war going to appease their own hatreds and superstitions. With a small group of friends around them, Wes and Tara have a hard job ahead of them, Tara’s harder than anyone’s as she tries to overcome the ‘protection’ of those around her which actually does more harm than good.

Overall, I would recommend this for any UF fan, male or female. I don’t normally care for YA and all the attendant ‘sturm und drang’ but this is not your typical YA. Tara is a great hero – she is strong and brave while still showing her lack of training and the shock and fear that such a tremendous change to her life, along with her fear for the safety of those she loves engenders. Of course, my favorite part of the book is during “the” big battle scene (there are several in the book) when her grandmother walks into a building full of warring Wolves and Hunters and commences to staking Wolves as if she is picking daisies. Awesome.

I received this book from the publisher in return for a realistic review. All thoughts are my own. The next book in the series is Cold Blood. Tara has been shipped off to Hunter Boarding School, where she will be safe and cozy and well-trained. Well, the well-trained thing might happen. The rest of it? Well, that is highly doubtful….

Create a free website or blog at WordPress.com.

Up ↑