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FIERCE: Sixteen Authors Of Fantasy – 0nly .99!

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Mercedes Lackey , Terah Edun , Michael G. Manning , K.F. Breene , Morgan Rice , Michael James Ploof , Daniel Arenson , Kate Sparkes , David Adams , Amy Raby , C. Greenwood , David Dalglish , K. J. Colt , Shae Ford , Endi Webb , Michael Wallace

Join epic fantasy legend Mercedes Lackey and fifteen additional New York Times, USA Today, and Amazon bestselling authors on the adventure of a lifetime!

Over one million words and sixteen realms of fantasy brought together for your reading pleasure. Discover courageous characters fighting for justice and order. Journey between kingdoms of dragons and lands of anarchy as tales of magic and mayhem unfold.

Grab it today, before it’s gone!

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Deal Ends: 3/25/2015

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Sensational Six Anthology

23622939As I have said before, I love anthologies. You can find both old friends, and new authors to enjoy. This collection of six stories, from shorts to a full-length novel, proves to be exactly the case.


Still Sexy ( a Hunter Protection Group story) by Sasha White, is only 30 pages, but it is so tightly written and well-paced that I am looking forward to reading more of the series. 1149251

When human, Caleb Mann, and his wife the psychic Gina (stars of Sexy Devil) decide to get away from the hectic life of raising their baby and spend a weekend away, they expect a nice, sensual weekend. Only, as is apparently the case in their lives, nothing turns out the way they intended . . . well, almost.


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Phantom Warriors 2: Saber-tooth by Jordan Summers is another paranormal. Katy Manfred is a trapper for what appears to be a biological corporation. Sent out to capture what appears to be a saber-tooth at the LA Brea Tar Pits, she finds much more than she expected. . . ‘otherworldly lover’ anyone? This story seems to be from a group of other shorts – the sort of short, sexy read that you can chill over for an hour or two. Summers has a large catalog I will check out at another time.


 

A Soul in the Hand by Marsheila Rockwell and Jeffrey J. Mariotte is a 94 page fantasy tale. Honestly? I wasn’t in the mood for swords, so I only scanned it. Meh. Not my taste if the parts I read. If you like more ‘high fantasy’ you may like it – I hope you do!


I enjoyed Glimmer by Vivi Anna, a Romantic Urban Fantasy of 12310579642 pages. I felt deeply for Nina Decker, abandoned by her fae mother at 10 and left to watch her father slowly waste away from fae sickness. Nina is an RN in a Vancouver hospital, and when a victim rolls in, supposedly the victim of a werewolf attack, she finds her whole life changing. Running into the wolf alpha as she leaves the hospital she is dragged kicking-and-screaming into a world she never wanted a part of. And when things begin to go disturbingly wrong, being a hated enemy to a wolf pack is a minor issue compared to what her life is truly becoming – what she is truly becoming . . . murderous pixies, evil fae, and more things than she can count that go bump in the night. Add in a vicious fae mum, and could life get turn into any more of a pain in the arse? Well. Yes, actually. Dawning and Portal are the others in the series.


 

The Darkening by Caris Roane is based on a series called The Guardians of 17318863Ascension which I haven’t read. This story contains death vampires and war, a damaged heroine and a warrior hero all set on Second Earth. It comes across as a sci-fi/fantasy/sword and sorcery series filled with ancient evil and magic. I tried, couldn’t do it. If you are a follower of the series, you will be adding it to your collection. I just couldn’t focus on it. That doesn’t make it bad, just not to my particular tastes.


15728681And finally, there is The Night Beat. I have read this book before, I realized that the minute I started it, and was tickled to no end. I had lost track of the book, but it crossed my mind occasionally over time, and I was thrilled to find it in its whole in this anthology. The first of the Necropolis Enforcement Files I remember thinking at the time I finished it back a few years ago that I absolutely wanted to put the second book on my ‘TBR’ stack. Then, of course, I got distracted. Come to find out, the second in the series comes out in 2015, so I won’t have to wait all that terribly long for the second. Go me!

 

It’s time to kick icky butt and take unpronounceable names . . . and undercover cop and werewolf Victoria Wolfe is there to take them on. Take them all on, along with an eclectic cast of famous dead musicians and writers, zombies and ghouls and mummies (oh, my!) all fighting on the side of right for whatever god or monster they have chosen to follow… and stopping ‘The Prince’ is on the very tippy-top of all their ‘must do’ lists. The good guys include a few who are not at all who you were taught to think they were, and sometimes even the bad guys can be the good guys under the right situation – but of course, when they are bad, they are so very, very bad . . . Can’t wait for the next in the series!

So, four out of six isn’t bad – not that the two I didn’t finish were bad, per se, the writing was good, they just didn’t trip my particular trigger. Another great .99 cent anthology!

Review: Chronicles of Steele By Pauline Creeden

Be as gentle as a dove but as cunning as a viper.
Preserve one’s self with intellect,
and know when it is time to be either the dove or the viper.

Hell is yourself and the only redemption is when a person puts himself aside to feel deeply for another person. – Tennessee Williams

I like nonsense, it wakes up the brain cells. Fantasy is a necessary ingredient in living, it’s a way of looking at life through the wrong end of a telescope. Which is what I do, and that enables you to laugh at life’s realities. – Dr. Seuss

ravenHere is an admission. As much as I have been interested and charmed by the concept of Steampunk, I have never read a book in the genre. Given the opportunity by the publisher to read Chronicles of Steele: Raven I can say that I am glad I waited. It is, in a word, delightful.

Raven Steele lives in a world of contradictions and extravagances of the surreal kind. Steam powered horses and mechanical humans live alongside flesh and blood beings. Dirigibles crowd the air while Victorian dress resides alongside leather and sword bearing private guards. Medical advances proceed alongside alchemy, and witchcraft is very real, in a sort of ‘physics meets alchemy meets herbology’ mashup. Sword and sorcery meets Victorian in an utterly enjoyable manner. The contradictions are charming and well written, a perfect introduction to a genre I was unfamiliar with.

Raven is a Reaper. Once the private (and very fatal) bodyguards and assassins to the Duke, they were disbanded when their leader, Raven’s father, refused to murder the Duke’s wife on his order. Hounded from the castle, his own men set upon him, her family flees, only to lose her mother to murder at the hands of the other Reapers. Trained by her father to be a Reaper in order to ascertain her safety from those who would murder her, Raven has travelled the lands, searching for redemption. A tenant of Reaper training, redemption is given through giving back a life for every life taken – and Raven’s balance sheet is nearly complete.

But freedom and real life are jerked from her grasp when she rescues the young Baron of New Hope, Darius. The child is handed over to Raven by his elder brother, Baron Solomon Goodhope, who entreats her to save the child from his murderous father. The evil Duke means the boy to die for supposedly being infested by a demon. But the story is much more, and much less, than the Duke believes. And when he sets his guards on Raven and Darius’s trail the consequences will be deeper than he could ever have expected.

Friends will become enemies and enemies possible friends as Raven begins a desperate cross-country race, by dirigible and train, horse and on foot, first to find the Witch she has been tasked to locate to cure the child, and then to save him once again from those who would murder him. Those who should by all rights keep him safe, but will kill in the name of the Duke, no matter how insane the order may be.

His conscience could not agree with what he was about to do. But orders were orders. And as captain of the guard, Jack always followed them to the letter.

Honor is found in the oddest places – but the boundless knee-jerk bone-headedness of mindless adherence to command structures and orders, even when deeply twisted and evil, is readily apparent. As well as a type of debilitating naivety on the part of people who should know better. But there is also a smile around every corner at the unexpected, the quaint, and the captivating. All of these things make the story appealing on so many different levels. Not only that, but there is an undercurrent here, another story line lying just below the surface which makes me eager for the next installment to the series!

While all these things are wonderful, there is one thing that bothered me. It may seem a small thing, but to me it is important to the presentation of the book. I was completely discombobulated by the cover. It presents as the cover for a Shamanistic Fantasy novel more than anything else. It is gorgeous, without a doubt, but it has absolutely no continuity with the story line. It is disconcerting to say the least. Without looking at the blurb I automatically expected the book to be on par with Patricia Briggs’s Mercy Thompson series, or possibly Ilona Andrews’s Kate Daniels series. Not for a true Steampunk novel. But again, it is a small thing that will possibly be of no interest to other readers.

I highly recommend this book for its strong heroine, well written story, and (yes, here is that word again) charming world building. Oh, and I was surprised to find that this is listed as “young adult” – but not in a bad way. It is a great story for young and young at heart. I will be watching anxiously for Darius’s story, the next in the Chronicles of Steele. And I will definitely be checking out others in the genre. I am hooked!

I received Chronicles of Steele: Raven from the publisher in return for a realistic review. All thoughts are my own.

If you like my reviews, it would be great if you could “Like” it on Amazon as well! Thanks all…

New Release: The Moonsparrow Collection by Carolyn Wolfe

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The Moonsparrow Collection is comprised of a tapestry of Tall Tales, Myth and Magic. This compilation of tales is the best of Ms. Wolfe’s original published and unpublished Short Stories, and includes the stories that she has introduced at local public writing events and festivals. The subject matter ranges from: A woman who turns a small town on its ear, to: a Magical midnight concert in the woods. It is a light journey into a magical world when anything can happen, and usually does.

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Title: The Moonsparrow Collection
Author: Carolyn Wolfe
Publisher: Avid Readers Publishing Group
Genre: Women’s Fiction/Magical Realism/Short fantasy and feminist stories
Format: Paperback Cover, Kindle version

Excerpt from The Moonsparrow Collection

 Moonsparrow_Cover_Carolyn_Wolfe[1]Mark U. Rye

This does not have any dragons or sword and sorcery, as a matter of fact it is more of a tall tale, but I think you just might recognize the main character, even if he is in disguise….. his name is the clue….

His name was Mark Rye, well actually, he would introduce himself far more formally then his deeply creased jeans would have suggested.  Mark U. Rye, he would grin, with a grin that sticks to you like warm oatmeal swallowed on an extra cold day.  The U. was for Ulysses, a name he was extremely proud of and never did he have the hesitation that some folks have about their middle, and somewhat old fashioned names.

Mark called himself a communicator, although his busted old guitar hardly seemed to command that sort of respectability, at least not at first sight.  But oh, that boy could make it sing with nine tongues and all of them golden!

Read the full excerpt at the author’s website

 A Beltane Tale

However, if she were really truthful with herself, she knew this was about more than just singing with him. His voice enchanted her, the simplicity of him singing in the woods, pouring his heart out with each word, set up a longing in her for more than just singing with him. That was the true reason she had not approached him.
This Beltane gathering conjured up all kinds of ideas in her head. She knew Beltane was a time of romance, fertility and new beginnings and that many a relationship had it’s not so humble beginnings at this time of year. She was just not quite ready for all the feelings this gathering had conjured up in her. She simply was not quite ready yet, at least that’s what she told herself.

Truck Stop Virgin
Brandy was quite a looker, the nearest thing to a sin in an unmarried woman, at least the women think so. Men are a bit more forgiving about that particular fault. Even so, everyone could tell just by looking at Brandy that this gal was trouble!

About Carolyn Wolfe

DIGITAL CAMERACarolyn Wolfe is a free-lance writer, published poet, and author of eight books, which range from poetry to fantasy and includes children’s literature. Her body of work includes writing articles for newspapers and newsletters, and hosting poetry events in the Winchester area.

Her books include two poetry books “Notes From The Shadow Self” and “WhenThe Moon Speaks”, a collection of original light fantasy stories titled “The Moonsparrow Collection” and four children’s books “The Bedtime Of The Sky and Other Sleepy-Bye Stories”, The Unhappy Little Dragon Lessons Begin” and “The Unhappy Little Dragon, Lessons Learned” and “The Drowsy House“.

Her latest fantasy/romance novella “Blades’s Magic” is a sword and sorcery adventure for an adult readership.

Wolfe lives in Winchester VA with her Husband Scott and many animal companions.

Review: The Sword And Its Servant by Victor Salinas

swordWhat first must be said about The Sword and Its Servant is that this is very much “High Fantasy Sword and Sorcery.” Good and evil is a large part of what the book stands for, though the whole concept of “gray areas” is a strong underlying theme. To be honest, I had thought that, being a “YA” book, that the violence would be minimal. And I would have been very wrong. This first in a six-part series is, in a word, nightmarish, with nightmarish scenes that would discourage me from recommending the book to the under-18 crowd.

With that said, this is indeed a very good book. There is an undercurrent of the horror genre that drew me in right away, as we first meet Johannes, whose nightmares we enter upon our first introduction to the story: He groaned as the terrible vision of a giant wolf chased him through his dreams. Dreams are an inherent theme throughout the book – though one would more easily say nightmares. Glowing eyes, shining in the dark . . .

The Sword and Its Servant is something more than a book. There is a whole world set up around the book series, the world of Grauwelt. Online, the Grauwelt follower is immersed into an experience well outside of the novel, as readers can immerse themselves into a whole world, including a role-playing game, Grauplay, on the publisher’s website. Apparently based upon a “Dungeons and Dragons” style platform, the site takes the storyline of the book series and pulls the reader even further into the storyline, and the world, of Grauwelt.

If you are a High Fantasy aficionado, with a penchant for horror, this is absolutely something you should check out. While the author and publisher say that the reading audience is “15 and up” I would, however, not recommend the book to those under 18. But then, maybe I am just behind the times. I know that bloody shoot-em-up, whack-of-body-parts violence is available to the younger set, but there is quite a bit of disturbing imagery in the book.

I received a copy of The Sword and Its Servant from the publisher in return for a realistic review. Personally, I will not continue the series, but for the proper audience, this is an exceptional read.

My Interview With Deborah Jay!

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The lovely and talented Deborah Jay!

Today, I will be introducing you to one of my favourite people, Deborah Jay. I have reviewed both of her books here on my site, and am happy to have her visit with me. Deborah Jay is the author (so far, of course!) of two marvelous books, the most recent of which is Desprite Measures. Her earlier book, The Prince’s Man is, as Deborah so eloquently puts it, Think James Bond meets Lord of the Rings. She is also the author of Desprite Measures, the first in The Caledonian Sprite Series a fantasy set in the area of Inverness, Scotland – and the holder of my own, personal “Best Cover Ever!” award!

But that isn’t all – Deborah also writes under the name Debby Lush, offering two must-have non-fiction books for the aspiring dressage competitor: The Successful Dressage Competitor: Everything You Need to Know about Competing in Dressage and The Building Blocks of Training: A Step-By-Step Guide to the Gymnastic Development of the Equine Athlete.

This fascinating woman is incredibly interesting. Have a read of our interview and I am sure you will agree!

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One of the things I get a kick out of when I read about you is your love of science fiction and fantasy “from birth.” So what was your favorite TV show, and how do your memories from that show help you write today?

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Now I have to go see if I can find it on Netflix!

Without doubt, Gerry Anderson’s UFO. It combined all my favourite elements – aliens, space travel and secrecy. For those who haven’t come across it, the premise was of an alien invasion by an advanced but dying race, visiting earth to harvest organs for transplant. Sometimes they’d take just the organs, sometimes whole people. The governments of the world wanted the whole thing kept secret, so the headquarters of SHADO (Supreme Headquarters Alien Defence Organisation) were beneath a film studio – a great place to disguise strange comings and goings.

The space travel was only as far as Moonbase, but this was just a few years post the real moon landings, so a functioning lunar base was an exciting prospect.

Although I’ve moved into writing fantasy these days, my first love was science fiction, and for me this series had it all. The clandestine side in particular shows up in both my novels so far – the need to keep secrets from the general population is a theme that I like to play with, as it’s one I don’t really approve of!

Many writers take up the pen from a very early age. When did you first start writing stories?

I started writing stories down as soon as I mastered a reasonable ability to wield a pen. I remember dreaming them up and telling them verbally even before that. I tackled my first novel at age 9, and then wrote and sketched a comic book series for several editions. Sadly my artistic talents are minimal, so after a bit I went back to straightforward writing.

I grew up in an era before computers (makes me feel ancient!) so keyboard skills were not taught in general education, but with the idea that I wanted to be a writer I taught myself to touch type when I was 11 years old, although my first few manuscripts were written longhand as I didn’t own a typewriter.

 Let’s stay young (we all like that, right?) When you were a child you read voraciously. So tell me who were your favorite authors of the day and how do they influence you today?

Early on I read lots of space stories, borrowing extensively from the library. Probably my first series love would be E. E. ‘Doc’ Smith’s LENSMAN series – lots of action, subterfuge, space travel and heroic but vulnerable characters. I moved on to the SF ‘classics’ – Frank Herbert’s DUNE, which blew me away with its scope, Asimov’s FOUNDATION TRILOGY where I developed my abiding love for secrets within secrets, and his ROBOT series for their mix of futuristic setting and detective work. Love, love, love THE 3 LAWS OF ROBOTICS, and was thrilled years later when the positronic brain showed up in Star Trek TNG, with Data and his daughter, Lal.

Heinlein’s novels also featured in there, along with WINDHAVEN (by Lisa Tuttle and guess who? One George R R Martin, years before he was famous!) and Anne Mccaffrey’s Dragon series, which started to blur the lines between SF and fantasy for me. And then I found Marion Zimmer Bradley’s DARKOVER series. Sigh. Oh, to write like that.

So how did I end up writing fantasy? That started with Ursula Le Guin’s A WIZARD OF EARTHSEA, which enthralled me with its exploration of the human psyche right along with magic and mystery.

If there is any direct influence from these authors, I think it comes out in my sheer love of entertaining story telling, with multiple plot strands and complicated characters undergoing life-changing experiences.

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The Prince’s Man is only a ‘click’ away!

Your first fantasy, The Prince’s Man is what I would call a true “Sword and Sorcery” novel. When did you first focus on the storyline, and how long did it take you to write the book? And another quick question: With oodles of 5-star reviews out there, is there anything you would do differently in the book now that it has been out there for a while?

It’s a long story, that begins some fifteen years ago. I wrote a work of fantasy for a publisher looking specifically for novellas. As luck would have it, the company folded just after I’d submitted my work. However, I was quite taken with the land and society I’d created, so I adapted an idea I’d had for a spy story in an SF setting, and put it into this fantasy world. I was amazed at how well it worked!

It probably took me a couple of years to write The Prince’s Man, and at least another to polish it. I’d entered the first chapter in a UK Arts Board competition and it won! The prize was a residential writing course, and the tutors were very encouraging, so I submitted it to an agent in the US and she took it on.

It went to all the big publishers, but all I got were encouraging negatives. While this was ongoing, I was building my writing credits, becoming a regular contributor to UK and US equestrian magazines, and when Prince’s Man failed to sell, I decided to have a go at non-fiction instead. This was more successful, and (as you’ll see further down) I have 2 non-fiction hardbacks in print.

At this point I still wanted a traditional deal with a fiction publishing house, so I tried again, this time writing my urban fantasy, Desprite Measures. This one was ready to query in 18 months, but by this time I’d started to become aware of the whole indie publishing scene, and after a couple of failed attempts to sell DM, I decided to go it alone. I spent a year researching and platform building before launching The Prince’s Man, including another spruce up because the manuscript was by now ten years old and my writing skills had moved on.

The Prince’s Man launched successfully to great reviews and an Amazon Top 100 ranking for more than 6 months – a huge thrill and the start of a new career.

Would I do anything different?

Yes. I wouldn’t use names starting with the same letters! My two main characters are Rustam and Risada. The gods are Chel and Charin, and Rustam’s surname is Chalice, while two of the kingdoms are Tyloc and Tyr-en.

Too late to change now, but I won’t make that mistake again.

Tell me about your writing ‘lifestyle’ if you would. Do you have a particular time you write, and do you hold to a fixed schedule or write when the “mood hits?”

I’m a night owl. It’s a hang over from Uni days – I write late at night when I’ve done everything else and the world is dark and quiet, so no interruptions. I do settle to my keyboard pretty much every night, though there’s so much other stuff, like blogging, answering emails, etc. (not to mention running my daytime business), so I can’t always guarantee to work on the current novel; that comes when I have a burning need to commit words to screen.

I do try to produce a minimum of 2500 words per week, but a sitting may produce 300 words or 2000+, I really don’t go in for daily word count goals. I’d love to be more disciplined, but I’ve tried that and my creativity dries up, so it’s a no go.

Desprite Measures is only a 'click' away!
Desprite Measures is only a ‘click’ away!

Desprite Measures” is actually the first of your books that I read, and I adored it. I know that some authors base their characters on personality traits of people they know. Were you thinking about any particular individuals while you wrote, and what were the things about them that drew your attention? And no, no names! 😉

Desprite Measures actually draws more on relationships I’ve experienced rather than individual personalities. I’m a bit of a disaster area in the relationship department, so I like exploring that area with my characters. Some of the real life situations I’ve got tangled up in would be way too far fetched for a novel…

Speaking of Desprite Measures, I love the setting of the story! Are the areas you describe places you have visited before? What do you like the most about the locations that you fold into your stories?

Pretty much all the places in Desprite Measures are real, and all locations I love and visit as often as I can – I have a page on my website devoted to photographs of these beautiful spots, all of them less than twenty miles from Inverness (Knock Knock – Leiah interrupting! Click on Inverness to go to Deborah’s Photo Page! We now return you to your regularly scheduled interview!). It’s such an awesome environment around there, wild and deserted and magical, yet so easy to get to. I’m can’t get enough of mountains and waterfalls, and the Scottish Highlands have them in abundance.

I have always heard the “old saw” that “Writers should write what they know.” What is your opinion? Should a writer only write about places they have seen themselves, or occupations they are familiar with? Of course, with books like The Prince’s Man that doesn’t really apply, but did you base the location upon locations you were familiar with?

Absolutely not. If we only wrote about what we know, we’d suffer a drought of great books! Research is one way – for Desprite Measures I researched Cassie’s occupation as a personal trainer by sitting in on some private gym sessions and asking a whole heap of questions.

Places are easy to research too, although it’s probably easier to write colourfully about locations you’ve actually visited.

In The Prince’s Man, you’ll find lots of little facts about horses and horse care; something I’m well able to supply with authority, as a way of weaving in personal knowledge to enhance the tale. Of course the setting is entirely fictional, so I mix up places I know with totally imaginary places designed to fit the story – there are enough real details for authenticity, but in fantasy, imagination can be all you need.

 I read that you have a degree in animal sciences and have studied coaching psychology. Do you use that training when you are developing your characters?

I’m a qualified sports coach – I’ve actually picked up the coaching psychology as I’ve gone along, because its useful, and because I find it fascinating. These days we focus a lot more on the mental side of preparing competitors because it can make all the difference between winning and losing at the elite level. For sure I find it extremely useful when developing my characters – I just wish I had time to study it more,

trainingLet’s talk about Debby for a moment. Many of your readers may not know this, but in our iteration of the space-time continuum, you are known as Debby Lush. Debby is a professional rider, trainer, judge and author of two books: The Building Blocks of Training and The Successful Dressage Competitor, published by J A Allen. How do Deborah and Debby work out their schedules? 

We micro-manage time! Without a closely planned schedule, neither Debby nor Deborah would be able to fulfill the requirements of both jobs.

I’ve become very adept at prioritizing, planning and scheduling; it’s the only way I can fit it all in. Just as well I only have animals to care for, not children!

On the other hand, I realized recently that I was in serious danger of not having any life outside of the two careers, so I’ve eased back on the self-imposed pressure, and allowed myself a little free time when I don’t feel guilty about not working!Dressage

 Indie authors are real people with real jobs. Does your ‘real life’ interfere with Deborah’s life, and how do you work around it? Do you have encouragement for other authors who are also working people?

It does and it doesn’t. I’m fortunate in that both aspects of my work are self-employed so I set my own schedules, although earning enough money to live on right now sometimes cuts into my writing, as that’s future income, not immediate.

Being an author is a compulsion – if it’s something you just have to do, you will find a way to fit it into your life. My advice on that is to find what works for you – we are all so different, leading such different lives, trying to copy someone else’s routine is unlikely to work. Be an individual – you will find a way.

Finally, the Summer Olympics in 2016 are set for Beautiful Brazil! Will you be competing? And if not, who do you expect to attend, and win, the dressage event? A horse loving girl wants to know!

2016_Summer_OlympicsI was fortunate enough to be an official at London 2012, so this time I’d like to attend as a spectator again (I went to both Athens and Hong Kong). I’d love to compete but I don’t have a horse of that quality.

As to who will win – well, the Brits of course!

Please check out Deb’s links here!

http://deborahjayauthor.com/

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Equestrian website

 

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Leiah here! I think you will agree that Deborah is an extremely interesting and talented person! I want to Thank You, Deborah, for visiting with us today!

Let’s all give Deborah a ‘virtual round of applause’ and I, for one, will be watching closely for her next book!

Bring on the CHOCOLATE!!! Treasures, Demons, and Other Black Magic Cover Reveal!

 

Treasures, Demons, and Other Black Magic!

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OH, yummy! Now I am going to have to go make rich, gooey DARK Chocolate cupcakes, then find my athame and have a party! Yippee, skippee, Rah Rah YUM!!!!

 

Biography

Meghan Ciana Doidge is an award-winning writer based out of Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. She has a penchant for bloody love stories, superheroes, and the supernatural. She also has a thing for chocolate, potatoes, and sock yarn.

Novels – After The Virus, Spirit Binder, Time Walker, Cupcakes, Trinkets, and Other Deadly Magic – Dowser #1, Trinkets, Treasures, and Other Bloody Magic – Dowser #2, Treasures, Demons, and Other Black Magic – Dowser #3

Novellas/Shorts – Love Lies Bleeding and The Graveyard Kiss

WARNING: author has been known to manipulate characters with chocolate, sex, and fantastical plotting. Readers beware http://author.to/meghancianadoidge

 Linkscupcake

Blog, www.madebymeghan.ca

Twitter, @mcdoidge

Facebook, Meghan Ciana Doidge

NEW RELEASE MAILING LIST

Amazon Author Page

Goodreads Author Page

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Mark Your Calendar! Thursday Is Cupcake Day!

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Check out the first two. Like chocolate, you won’t be able to resist the third!

I can hardly wait! going to go back and give the first two a quick read so that I am prepared for the next!!

And don’t forget Meghan’s other wonderful books! These are new covers for the Dowser series, but her other works have great covers as well, and you can even see the old-style cover for Cupcakes below.

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Click for Meghan’s Goodreads page!

Review: Spirit Binder – Meghan Ciana Doidge

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You really need to click the cover and buy this book.
BTW, is this an awesome cover, or what?!

Before I start this review, I should say that I owe Meghan an apology. She asked me to review her book over a month ago, and I just got so involved in my own life, it slipped out of my fingers. But here it is, and I can definitely say, I was denying myself a great pleasure by waiting so long!

I started my love of fantasy back in grade school, when I picked up a copy of Beowolf and was totally enthralled. I then was given a copy of Lord of the Rings and my reading fate was set thereafter.

Recently, I have found myself moving away from my love of fantastic literature and into more modern veins, and hadn’t even really realized it. Reading Meghan’s Spirit Binder brings me back to those times, and back to the feelings that they inured within me. The sense of scope, of breadth, of tales of magic and hopefulness that open out the soul and exercise the mind.

This isn’t Beowolf, nor is it Tolkein. It is a sweeter, gentler story all its own, filled with a magic that one can identify with and comprehended. There is a strong layer of a past dystopia, now forgotten and yet living all around – The Before. Now, magic and trolls and maybe even a dragon or two roam the lands. And much like Tolkein, and yes, the author of Beowulf, whomever that may be, lost in the annuls of time, this story encompasses as much the magic of the human soul as it does magic itself. Theo is a woman who is, supposedly, a prophesied fountain of power and magic, whose very being is to change the world. As a youngster she is spirited away, to an unknown location by person or persons unknown. Now, ten-years later, she has returned, bloody, battered and dying, to the world she used to know, with her memory gone. What happens after this is a story in the vein of the great old stories, and yet with a modern twist overall that makes the story eminently readable, understandable and immensely enjoyable.

Highly recommended.

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As stated previously, this book was provided to me by the author for a realistic review. That has no impact on my opinion. I just simply loved the book.

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